Tag Archives: gender

Boy/girl, boy/girl

MSGM menswear catwalk

MSGM menswear S/S 15

Fashion’s love of androgyny and fluid gender have taken a more practical step forward, with the increasing appearance of womenswear on menswear catwalks, and vice versa.

Y-3 catwalk menswear

Y-3 menswear S/S 15

At the recent menswear S/S 15 shows, collections from JW Anderson (who loves a bit of boy/girl fashion) to Givenchy’s delicate florals, Marc Jacobs’ dreamy pinks and Dries Van Noten’s balletic flourishes all offered something for the girls as well as the targeted boys.

Meanwhile, menswear shows from designers as diverse as Prada, Y-3, MSGM, Daks and Katie Eary also featured women on the catwalk.

Prada catwalk menswear

Prada menswear S/S 15

In an interview with The Telegraph, Miuccia Prada gave an insight into how some designers are approaching their men’s and women’s collections:

“I am introducing more and more women [in menswear]. Because I think the combination is more real. It is more today. Otherwise it looks like we are in classes, in the time of my grandfather, women divided from men. The shows divided are so unreal and I think that it is when you put them together you get a sense of what is meaningful and real…Basically I think to people, not to gender.”

I originally wrote this post for uniquestyleplatform.com

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Flawless strength

Amidst all the noise about Beyonce’s new “surprise album” is a seeming shift in policy from Queen Bey. After sidestepping the inevitable “are you a feminist” question for a good few years — disappointing cultural commentators and fans alike — she’s now smartly aligning herself with feminism without actually answering the question, by sampling author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie‘s great TEDTalk on new track Flawless.

I’m ashamed to say i hadn’t watched Adichie’s talk before (there’s really a lot of TEDTalks and only so much time in the day!), but, led by Bey, i was captivated by it (as I’m sure many more fans will be). Powerful, thoughtful, touching and funny, the author talks about how women make themselves smaller to be less threatening to men, pretending to be less than they are and turning that pretence into an art form.

She also raises the excellent point that many of the characteristics that led men to be more prominent (such as physical strength) are decreasingly important in modern business, which instead prizes intelligence, creativity and innovation. Many writers and commentators say that these are “feminine” qualities, but I rather disagree (not least because it seems a conciliatory gesture  – “Men may rule the world, but women are creative, nurturing” etc.) Like Adichie, I believe that neither gender owns these talents or skills – they are up to an individual to cultivate and explore. Ascribing certain values to one gender or another – no matter if they are positive or not – keeps people in gender boxes, dictating who we should be rather than who we are. And while physical strength may have lost its prominence, the strength we gain — men or women — from being ourselves is an increasingly important currency. 

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